Shifting is more than Shift Left

Links on the topic: Shifting is more than Shift Left as presented at the OnlineTestConf Fall 2017.

My own writings:

by @KatjaBudnikov #katjasays
by @KatjaBudnikov #katjasays
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On Medium regarding Testing, AI, ML etc

I’m writing on Medium regarding Testing, Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning etc:

More to testing than AI and ML can solve

Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Machine Learning (ML) can perhaps solve some testing challenges, but not all testing. The testing vs. checking debateand all the shift-left of checking, have revealed that some of testing is about critical thinking and some…

 See also

Similar posts: Testing is wicked, Test all the things,

mad-brain

Teaser for Online Test Conf 2017

I’m speaking at the Fall 2017 Online Test Conference on the topic: Shifting is more than Shift Left 

Change is happening to the testing activities. Shift-left automates and codifies the testing activities. Shift-right does it for production.

This session will be about a couple of other trends, changes and shifts that’s happening to testers and test managers.

– Shift-Coach, where It’s more about coaching teams.

– Shift-SME, where it’s more about business savvy.

– Shift-Deliver, where it’s more about the road to production

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Blogposts:

Teaser for Experiences in Testing Infrastructure Projects

I’m presenting at UKSTAR 2018 on the Topic: Experiences in Testing Infrastructure Projects. The content is a continuation of my materials and talks about testing outside the SDLC, in this context operations and infrastructure. It’s additional problems and examples compared to “How to test in IT Operations” at Nordic Testing Days 2016.

UKSTAR 10% OFF ANY TICKET WITH CODE
UKSTAR 10% OFF ANY TICKET WITH CODE

Relevant blog posts, but not talk content:

The talk is in the same field as this talk – by Mike Talks @testsheepnz although with no applications on top… and other stories 😉

 

A 30 Days Agile Experience

In September 2017 the Ministry of Testing had a crowd-based knowledge sharing event called “30 Days of Agile Testing” with a small learning activity for each day of the month. As with the similar security event I set up a weekly schedule at work to meet for an time-boxed hour and discuss 3-5 selected topics each time.

Our score was 17 topics discussed – some more discussed than actually tried out. Hence the half marks on the poster on the window below. Me and my coworkers work on many different teams – so to dig into specific team tools and processes was out of scope.

Here is a few of our findings:

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Links to “the Club” on some of the topics we selected:

 

 

Less Test Managers, More Test Coaches

One of the trends/shifts I experience in testing & test management in particular is the Test Coach as discussed initially here: The Shift-Coach Testing Trend (Oct, 2016). Recently (Aug 2017) it came up again in a Twitter thread, where Stephen Janaway stated the inspiration to the title of this blog post.

Less Test Managers and more coaches. That’s how I see it going.

Fittingly as he inspired the first post with his talk “How I Lost My Job As a Test Manager” presented at Test Bash 2015. This post is a further elaboration of the Shift-Coach test management trend. Here are some of my experiences:

  • I have been assigned to an agile development team to introduce them to 3 Amigos, Test data driven test automation and such things. The purpose of my involvement was to enable the team to continue the practices without me, and without testers besides the business analyst / product owner (See The domain expert is the tester) as they are doing Shift-left. Similar to an agile or scrum coach, my approach was to look at it as a change in the way of working.
  • Another project is an infrastructure project, there are no testers only technicians configuring Cisco routers that by software can replace firewalls, iron ports, VM servers and other network equipment. The project has to implement 80+ of these, so I setup both a test process and an ITIL change request process acting as a test and release manager – another quite frequent trend. I could continue in the project for the duration, but instead I setup guidance and leave when it’s sufficiently in place.

This might be similar to a test architect, a (internal) test consultant activity. It has nothing to do with diminishing testing. Rather I see it as more testing happening, something that would not have been done without the coaching from a test manager. It’s all about finding a test approach that is fit for the context.

Here are some things others have written:

The competence of the test coach is to have enough change management expertise (people skills) and test management expertise (domain skills) to know how to coach and facilitate the change. Should test coaches test too, perhaps when required, but not necessarily. The activity is primarily to up-skill the team to continue on their own.

The “Test Coach” is a trend similar to “shift-left” and all the other shifts in testing and test management. I see it as a pattern, and what I read from the threads and discussions is that many test managers gradually shift towards test coaches.

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Don’t request the kitchen sink

More and more often I see outsourcing contracts that requests 10-15 test phases. It looks like someone has simply thrown the book at it, and not considered if it is an infrastructure project, a software development project or COTS implementation or – what on earth, they actually want to learn from the testing.

These are the phases of a recent project:

  • Environment Acceptance testing
  • Hardware and integration testing
  • Component testing
  • Component- integration testing
  • Installation test
  • System testing
  • Functional testing
  • Regression testing
  • Security testing
  • Performance testing
  • Operational acceptance testing
  • Service Level testing

It’s a challenge in the vendor reply. The vendor will want to reply to all test phases in order to be compliant with the tender, and not loose points. There is no room for elaboration or discussion if you want in on the bid process.

Quite often the requester comes back and say “we didn’t want all those weird testing things, we just want something that works for us”. But when the contract is signed and the work set in motion the project team have challenge to make the testing practical within the framework of the contract. This goes from both sides. Many good hours can be wasted with unwinding cumbersome contractual terms.

What I usually do in such a situation is to bundle the contract’s testing scope into fewer activities, and setup a mapping so that everything is covered. That is if the client allows me to make the activities practical and context-driven. If not – my hands are tied, and we deliver according to spec – even if the chapters of the test plans are set in stone.

Let’s work towards better deals for testing activities. If you are looking to prepare a BID include a test manager – and have a discussion of the value-add and learning of testing up front. There is no one book of how to do testing. Instead spend the time and money figuring out your context. Figure out what phases are on the client side, and what is on the vendor side. Have a test management consultant on retainer for before and after the bid process. Do something to discuss your test strategy and put the guidelines in the contracts, so that the vendors can propose a solution.

Don’t request everything and the kitchen sink too

Everything and the kitchen sink
Everything and the kitchen too