The Testing, not the Testers

Occasionally I see posts and discussions, where testers are indignated that this and this company has no testers. How could they! Or similarly when a product is released publicly with significant issues: See – it’s because they have no testers! Or that the testers are not taken seriously. OMG!

Continue reading

3 Visual Models on Quality

Besides the visualization of the delivery pipeline it can be a good idea to visualize your quality model. There’s more to it than V-model, Agile/Scrum and other old models. The following models are at least as established and practice based as any old book

Continue reading

Further reading for Contest NYC 2019

Materials used for the talk and workshop at Contest NYC 2019:

One page test plan

Wardley Maps

Research:

Test management / Test Coach

Subject Matter Experts

Practical tips:

The subject matter expert in LEGO knows the bigger pieces left goes into the model.
The subject matter expert in LEGO knows the bigger pieces left goes into the model.

You don’t have to be a boss to be a leader

It’s really that simple, yet awesomely profound. And a typical Gerald Weinberg quote, like my other favorites of their points:

  • No matter how it looks at first, it’s always a people problem (The second law of consulting)
  • You’ll never accomplish anything if you care who gets the credit
  • Things are the way they are because they got that way
  • Quality is value to some person

Regarding the last quote; which was later extended with “who matters, at some time“. Once I had an argument about how to deliver quality. The other side held towards IEEE definition of delivering the expected. But even when they did, they failed to see that the unmeasured and irrational parts affected the value to the customer. I agree completely with The Cowboy Tester that knowing works of Weinberg is a measure of seriousness.

Weinberg worked not only with testing, but among other things also consulting and organisational change management. I did not know that when reading “Making Sense of Change Management” (Cameron & Green 2012). I literally jumped up and started laughing while reading the quite serious elaborations to the Satir Change model – the authors found that Quality Software Management: Anticipating Change (1997) is a “masterly book on change, but with a title that might not appeal to everyone“. It might not appeal to change scholars, but definitely appealed indirectly to a lot of people in testing.

Recently (August 2018) Jerry died aged 84. Not a boss – yet a leader.

Diversity is important for testing, prejudice isn’t

I want the field of testing to have high diversity

  • Different personality types:
    • we need people to get ideas, and people to finish them
    • We need people to see the strategic view, and people to get into the details
  • Different backgrounds
    • We need people that can code
    • We need people that understand the business domain
  • Different business domains
    • We need testers in the field of software development
    • We need testers in the field of IT / ITIL service delivery
    • We need device testers, embedded software testers….
    • We need testers that understand the GxP regulations
    • We need testers that understand rapid and agile delivery
  • Different people
    • Parents, singles, people with kids and without
    • Young people, experienced people
    • People who take it as a lifestyle, and people to whom it’s just a job

…most of all people. People who knows that things can be done in many ways. Let’s get rid of the prejudices that testing is for the detailed and i-dotting only. Testing is about bringing information to the stakeholders about what works and what doesn’t – it’s never about “failure is not an option”.

Recently I was required to do a Cubiks Problem solving test. It’s a 12 minute online test in word patterns, calculations and geometric patterns. Apparently I “failed” to complete all in time, but had a high degree of right answers, so my score was “average” #whatever. That apparently made me perfect to the testing area… OH NO – it only tells you that I put pride in my own work. Everything else is pure speculation and prejudice, as mentioned by Gerry Weinberg in Psychology of Intelligent Problem Solving there is a challenge with these kinds of tests for problem solving – they test, but not for problem solving.

Testing is about solving problems – business problems. Like can we ship?

See also:

Things are the way they are…

attributed to Gerald Weinberg as quoted by Adam Goucher on [Set Course For Awesome (as a ‘Career Tester’)].

As Adam writes:

It was during RST that I really understood that the role of a tester isn’t to ‘break the app’ or ‘find all the bugs’ but to provide information about the application. It wasn’t until some time later than I realized that it is actually more subtle than that. Our job is to provide information that matters. And how do we do that? Easy. We Shut Up and Listen. To what? That is also easy. To the people we are providing the information to. Now that I’ve completed PSL I can safely start quoting Gerry Weinberg so here are two useful things to remember.

  1. No matter how it looks at first, it’s always a people problem
  2. Things are the way they are because they got that way

If you can start to understand the people in the system you are operating in, and why the [larger] system operates the way it does then you can provide them the information they need. But you can’t do that unless you stop, shut up, and listen.

See also: When it smells fishy, there is something fishy going on