Connected online

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Apparently my Internet habits are very teenage like… I miss my WiFi and cannot leave the phone in the pocket. What I am is a digital settler, connected to my processional community.

I realized this at a training recently, where it was noticed that I had my phone out DURING CLASS. Was it FOMO – no, I just had a thought about testing to share on twitter. As I would usually do during conferences and my working day. We had a good laugh about me always needing my internet and my phones. I took it as a compliment, as that would mean that I was a YOUNG digital rookie, sharing and collaborating. .. like only the cool kids would do.

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When I model  myself to the Teaching Trios model – I am a digital settler by age/ introduction time. But collaborating and having an online professional interaction is not based on age, nor should it be frowned upon. Online community interaction is done by all ages, diverse and really nothing new. It’s past hype, and not ground breaking. There are models now of how communities evolve and function. And the business, career and personal benefits explained over and over again.
Yet I have more followers on twitter than the company I work for. Sometimes when someone else at work shares curated testing papers, I have seen it already and have met the people who wrote it. (Read Meet the famous people)
When I model myself towards Simon Wardley‘s three-stage model (Pioneers, Settlers, town planners). I don’t jump anything brand new, but I do want to take the groundbreaking and turn it into a framework for others to succeed… So to my kids Netflix is TV, and my mom follows me on Facebook to see what I’m up to. (no good, I swear).

Testers are Knowledge Workers

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Treat your testing people as knowledge workers, not rote industrial resources. The later is a spiral to the lowest value, the former is about giving the business valuable knowledge. A modern tester is a knowledge worker – whose prime area is finding information, filtering information, relating information and presenting information. It is a non-linear process, that requires a touch of both creativity and consideration.

The best testing tool is the brain, and the knowledge worker ponder the problems both consciously and unconsciously. She can work without using the hands or legs, but not with a simple headache. It takes a lot of thinking and collaboration with the stakeholders to identify what questions about the product has value to the business. The (context-driven) knowledge focused tester focus both that it works, and that it adds value to the business.

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The business focus are far from the classic mindset of testing established around the millennial (2000). where testing is about finding defects and going through the motion of deriving test cases from specifications. – I know I’ve been there. That era is long gone, even dead at some time to Whitaker and Alberto Savoia. Be provoked or even insulted, but it’s the future.

But wake up – it’s not where the testing world is today. The old tools of design techniques and coverage metrics makes less and less sense to the business. They are old-school and classic approaches, in the not so cool way. The cool kids on the block are poppin’ tags – getting new stuff, sharing and exploring. They know that change is the new normal and that what works in one situation doesn’t work in another. Their primary concern and focus is getting knowledge to the decision makers. They are the knowledge workers

Here – have some of my power

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One of the ways I lead the team of testers in my project is through delegation of power from my own role…

1) A test manager in my group asks guidance. The members in the project team does not reply her requests or give her the information she needs. As a test manager in the project she does have the theoretic power, but not the practical power… I send her back with all my powers – to tell them that because I said so, they should respect her. I don’t mind taking “stars” of my shoulders and giving the power of my role and position to someone junior to me.

2) A tester on my project team approaches me to ask for permission to create tasks on our task board. I immediately grant her a “do every thing you need to do, without asking“-permission. By all means take the initiative and ownership. I probably fail to manage everything, so we need to work together on this. By all means go ask the developer, create test cases, find things we didn’t know – think.. and test.

Sometimes I think, this is perhaps a Danish “equality” culture – but then I realize it is a collaborate approach for the modern knowledge worker. It works equally well with people from both India, Denmark, Philippines and China.

My style is not to CONTROL – but to facilitate KNOWLEDGE. In my team the team is the star

vikings

It all starts with an odd piece

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One of my coworkers had gotten himself a LEGO 10242 MINI Cooper, and by the help of the other consultants it had been build (to spec?). We look over the remaining pieces and discuss how come. All the 1×1 plates are quite expected, there are extras of these because the weights aren’t that precise and the pieces are cheap. Also customers easily loose them, so it’s cheaper to send some extra than to handle through customer service. On BrickLink inventory there is even a fan made list of the usual extra items….

But an extra black 2×4 plate – naa. That’s odd.. And surely it missed on the bottom of the car. I had prior knowledge .. but have not built this exact set.

Now I have another hunch that the two gray 1×3 tiles and 1×1 dark green bricks in to the rear are missing somewhere. A good thing those consultants have a test department, one could say…  Still the pieces seem not to be 1-CRITICALLY missing, so the model is DONE and accepted. So even if the LEGO tester gets to ask “what if” – we have to remember to hear the answer to “does it matter” – even if it is our favorite hobbyhorse

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Chicken for Christmas – Tradition is a choice

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TL;DR: Testing is always something that we choose to do – and how we test is similarly a matter of choice. As is Christmas traditions. .. it’s just man-made rules, we can choose to change them.

So I was discussing what we should have for Christmas with the stakeholders. One of them wants the traditional rice pudding, the other wants – untraditionally: chicken. And you know what – that’s ok. Traditions are guidelines, not rules – we can make new traditions, just by choosing to.

Testing in production used to be a great no-no. I’m still feeling odd when we do it, but I have come to see it as another tool of the trade. It has a name now “testing in the wild” TTitW as has been presented at EuroStar 2015. Also this is how Netflix have been testing for years, from GitHub, as it is open source too (!).

You might argue that changing testing (in the wild) is not allowed. I will challenge that assumption – being allowed to do something is a choice too. You choose to follow the the process frameworks, requirements, rules… and you can choose not to. The tradition of manual predefined testcases are so four years ago!

Sometimes it’s just a matter of saying up-front, that you are tailoring the process. So choose an approach that actually gives meaning and value to the stakeholders and context. Deconstruct the traditions and commercial bodies of knowledge and make some new!

The superpower that things will sort themselves out

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Amongst my secret weapons are intuition, square lashings, preparing for the unexpected

… and that things will sort themselves out.

For instance:

  • I had planned to step into the parents group (aka PTA, aka forældrerådet) in one of my boys classes. But the day of the election meeting, I was pretty stressed and missed the meeting. Now a couple of months later, there’s a free spot, and I could step in and be very welcome.
  • At work I saw my boss had assigned me a new project for next month. I missed to talk to him about it, but when came around to it – the project allocation had been cancelled.

So recently I have come to value: letting things sort themselves out OVER looking into everything. THAT IS while there is value on preparing everything, I value the first opportunity more.  You might think of it of being sloppy, unprepared and not even tester like.. your loss… What is your secret weapon then?

dad blackbelt

Bugs Happens

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There is no such thing as bug free solutions. Zero defects – is just human definition of what a defect is – oh, and the acceptance criteria of no severity 1-critical defects, is always negotiable. Acceptance of the delivery may be outside the test result… You always find things, you always choose how to handle them. There is always a threshold on what you want to fix. What sets you apart from others is HOW you handle the unexpected issues you DO find.

Google has Canary builds, Spotify their chaos monkeys, others have continuous delivery. Some even test in the Wild. How you choose to handle the things discovered is – a choice, similarly as it is a choice to handle them at all.

In all business environments errors happen – even or context new issues / bugs / defects / findings / incidents… happens, when you evaluate (test) a solution. Even in the strictest GxP Pharma validation there will be situations that is not specifically on par with the reviewed and approved scripts. Even the best CMMi or ISO29119 accredited company will stumble into new information, or test only limited subsets of total coverage.

If you fail to prepare for the unexpected – you chose poorly.

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