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Mindmaps for 400

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Finally non-profit self-organizing software testing is happening in Denmark. On may 21 2014 we actually had two events:

At the first I was glad to share my experiences using mind maps in software testing, note taking and information structuring. (Get the PDF Xmind mind map here: https://jlottosen.files.wordpress.com/2014/05/mindmaps-400.pdf)

You stop going deeper down the tree, when there is nothing more knowledge to gain, just like good (exploratory) testing.

Cultural context of the “for 100″ comes from the Jeopardy TV Quiz, where the questions come in 4 levels: 100, 200,300, 400 for the  increasingly harder questions. The prize is similarly $100 for level 100 etc.  

Left to my own devices I probably would

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You can easily do a half-marathon

Yes I could, but the thing is it would need longer runs. I run with the Running Club Tuesdays and Thursdays before dinner. As a simplified example – if dinner get’s delayed the kids won’t eat as well, then they can’t fall asleep – and will need to eat past their bed time. They will sleep too late, and we (the parents) will have less time to the evening chores and being together. Every time there is something I’d like to do, there is always something else that matters that doesn’t get done.

Come to X-conference – it’s just a matter of priority if you’re one of the ones

Sure, it is – that’s easy for you to say.  But €2000 + travel is out of my private pocket, missing work hours is out of my pocket, being away from family is out of both my time and their time. And really €4000 is a lot of money in a family with two kids with special needs – where the income is one job, one early retired. Also it’s a stupid argument, as I can point to heroes of testing that I consider “one of the ones” that like me aren’t going to both this and that.

I can do a Test Bash, write blog posts* and articles for the Testing Planet etc. 

I can run 14km in 1½ hours. 

14km

(*: and I’ll try to get back to blogging more)

Quote Left to my own devices

and I could
and left to my own devices
I probably would
Left to my own devices
I probably would
Oh, I would

Related:

 

Use case 115: It was a dark and stormy night

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Discussing relevance of testcases, user stories and requirements is an age-old challenge in IT development. Sometimes we think we know the usage of our software so much better, than the users – that we laugh and say: That would never be the case. But it may very well be.

The reason for undertaking the largest national construction project is so that the capital region can get fresh milk.” That’s what the minister of transportation said [1] – and boy we laughed. Why would we invest billions, 7 years and 18 km bridge so that one part of the country could supply fresh milk for the other (that had it’s own dairies).

A commercial[2] for a dairy snack (oh the irony) later alleged that this decision was made on an empty stomach[3]. But it wasn’t – with regular ferry service since 1883, the people wanted to cut the time from 90 minutes to 15 minutes, with all the added benefits of increased trade, travel and traffic.

The link opened in 1998 and a stormy night in 2006 the bridge closed for traffic. No big deal – it happens. It so happened that it closed for 22 hours. And hence the ecological milk dairy on the ”countryside” couldn’t deliver milk for the ”capital” side [4]. And the scenario from the minister of transportation had become no laughing matter.

Your user is not you - http://www.developsense.com/blog/2013/12/your-user-is-not-you/

The baristas wept as there was no ecological skimmed milk

1: DK video: http://larslars.net/blog/2009/04/derfor-fik-vi-storeb%C3%A6ltsbroen/
2: Similar to this one http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b2UrushQ86I
3: Why being hungry is bad for decision-making http://blog.bufferapp.com/8-things-you-dont-know-are-affecting-your-decisions-every-day
4: DK text: http://www.landbrugsavisen.dk/Landbrugsavisen/2006/5/26/Ingen+frisk+maelk+over+Storebaelt.htm

Quality comes in all shapes and sizes

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Quality comes in all shapes and sizes .. like Christmas trees. This Christmas I was out selling trees at the local “shopping center ” with my oldest.Most left with a tree that satisfied the acceptance criteria – explicit as well as implicit – yet still no one came with a requirement spec…

2013-12-14 10.33.55

Heuristics from the merry christmas tree salesmen:

  • The  tree looked at first – is usually returned to and bought
  • Do A/B split testing between one or two trees
  • Too many options makes selecting even more confusing
  • One family’s reject – is another family’s perfect fit
  • Context is important – like how much room inside, how many people, how many kids
  • The closer to deadline – the less options
  • No one notices the wicked branches, when the music plays and the tree is lit
  • After christmas it doesn’t matter how picky you were with the details

A young woman came to us looking a bit puzzled – she had never bought a tree herself, and the tree been bought was not for her. All she knew was that she had volunteered to do charity help to a down-and-out family. They wanted a tree for christmas – but could not themselves. I can only guess that this specific christmas tree was the family’s perfect tree. The cost didn’t matter to the young woman at all – but the implicit value even more.

Many decisions are never about the monetary (sunk) costs. Hence your customer makes seemingly odd decisions – and that’s OK. 

See also: Acceptance criteria are more than what can be measuredLook for Minimum Viable TestingWithout Timing – Quality, Schedule and Cost is nothingValue of Information for Decisions , 16 points that may rock the boatWhen do testing happen? Are you looking too hard

FDA, Exploration and time to information

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A key driver in implementing enterprise knowledge management is to reduce time to information (77% are seeing faster access to knowledge). But that goes for LinkedIn and Twitter too. Using twitter professionally helps you meet the famous people and help you see the communication layers at conferences. Case story: Today I was reading about test processes in a regulated environment, and got curious towards exploratory testing in that context. So I reached out to the #twitterbrain and asked the giants, whose shoulders I am standing on*:

  • Griffin Jones ‏@Griff0Jones, help clients struggling with regulatory compliance and context-driven software testing problems.
    • CAST 2011: Cast 2011 What Do Auditors Expect From Testers
    • What is good evidence – Let’s Test 2013
    • WREST – Workshop on REgulated Software Testing
  • Johan Åtting ‏@JohanAtting Chief Quality Officer -atSectra’s Medical Operation
    • turned the testing from a traditional scripted approach into a context driven approach and introduced exploratory testing.
    • ensuring that the company are regulatory compliant with e.g. FDA, MDD, CMDR, ISO13485, ISO14971 etc.
  • James Christie ‏@james_christie
    •  interested in testing’s relationship with audit and governance.
    • dedicated to the audit, control, and security of information systems.
  • Michael Bolton ‏@michaelbolton Program Chair of EuroStar 2013 and key guru pointed me to an article by James Marcus Bach ‏@jamesmarcusbach on the topic.
  • Keith Klain ‏@KeithKlain Head of Barclays Test Service retweeted on the fallacy on the evidence of scripted testing.
  • Claire Moss ‏@aclairefication (my favorite retweeter) and many others retweeted

Within 2 hours I had both relevant references, a debate on the pitfalls and base for further details. Follow the tread of this tweet: https://twitter.com/jlottosen/status/411473074312052736 

*: really, not to brag – I have met both Griffin, Johan and James, and they know me too :)

Testing has to be fit for purpose too

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Reading some quality process documents I found the following definition:
  • To detect and remove errors before the computer system is put into production
  • To demonstrate that the computer system is fit for intended use

But when we look at the ITIL definition of the value composition of a service – it looks fit for use, as above: follows the requirements, sufficient – what the customer gets. But also – at an equal base, it looks at fit for purpose: it has a positive effect on the business, it solves a business problem, solving the right problem. The product is a solution. If the problem isn’t solved, the product doesn’t work.

see also: Uncovering better ways  Softwaretesting is only dead, if it stands still I didn’t open it

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