We find bugs, irregularities, this that should be there, and things that shouldn’t. From that we create a bug report, and from that someone looks into it, and then it’s a wrap. Unless the information is not returned, an no-one is the wiser. A bug report to me is a representation of an observation of the system, usually something that’s wrong. Some tools and vocabularies calls this “defects”, “bugs”, “tickets”, “incidents”. A bug report can be an email, post-it, or even a mentioning in passing [2].

Here are some recent sample headlines:
– The design is unclear, please elaborate
– With this role, I can access this, which I shouldn’t
– When I compare the requirements to the delivery list, I find these ..
– There is no data here, but there should be
– We thought we wanted this, but now we want something else
[3]

Notice that a bug report usually originates with a person, making an evaluation. This person is the tester, no matter the functional hat (SME, SDET, PO, VP). This may be tool supported, coming from a log of automated checks, or from BDD or Jenkins or what not. No matter the amount of tools, a person is making an informed decision, and raising the bug.[4] Come to think of it, she could choose to do nothing. But something is bugging her [5].

Here are some recent replies to my bug reports:
– it is by design
– it works on the development environment
– that’s how the COTS (or framework or platform) handles it
– ok, got it. seems like an easy fix
– awrh, now we have to rethink the whole thing
– Defferred, FixedUpStream, Rejected,
– Hmm, I see what you mean. Let me look into it

These replies come from some other person than the tester – let’s call him the fixer. First of all the fixer evaluates the report – he makes a decision, based on his context and his available information. Sometimes it’s an easy fix, sometimes it cannot be reasonably fixed. Sometimes the fix have diminishing returns. And everything in between.

What is very important to me, is that the fixer communicates his immediate evaluation to the tester. As quickly and transparent as possible. The fixer, to me, does not have the option to close it [1] alone. Nor can he fix the bug without letting the tester know. In the end the tester calls whether it is resolved or acceptable given the updated information. If the tester and fixer cannot agree, then call for outside help. And only then, let the two people work it out first.

The bug report and “fixer reply” has to be returned to the tester. Either the fix has to be tested, or the no-fix has to be tested too. It’s all part of the game – and it’s all integral to improve the quality in the short run – by fixing this specific project. It is an integral part in improving the quality in the long run, by adding knowledge and collaboration to the solution of the bugs found. Every bug, every clarification, every wish from the test to investigate something about the product counts towards collaborating about the quality of the solution.

TL;DR: Always direct the reply to a bug back to the person who found it.

1: Closure http://www.ministryoftesting.com/2014/11/closure/
2: Mentioning in passing, aka “mipping” http://www.satisfice.com/blog/archives/97
3: 3 types of bugs http://cartoontester.blogspot.dk/2010/06/3-types-of-bugs.html
4: How to raise a bug http://cartoontester.blogspot.dk/2012/10/3-steps.html
5: Something that bugs someone whose opinion matters. http://www.satisfice.com/glossary.shtml#Bug

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