Quality comes in all shapes and sizes .. like Christmas trees. This Christmas I was out selling trees at the local “shopping center ” with my oldest.Most left with a tree that satisfied the acceptance criteria – explicit as well as implicit – yet still no one came with a requirement spec…

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Heuristics from the merry christmas tree salesmen:

  • The  tree looked at first – is usually returned to and bought
  • Do A/B split testing between one or two trees
  • Too many options makes selecting even more confusing
  • One family’s reject – is another family’s perfect fit
  • Context is important – like how much room inside, how many people, how many kids
  • The closer to deadline – the less options
  • No one notices the wicked branches, when the music plays and the tree is lit
  • After christmas it doesn’t matter how picky you were with the details

A young woman came to us looking a bit puzzled – she had never bought a tree herself, and the tree been bought was not for her. All she knew was that she had volunteered to do charity help to a down-and-out family. They wanted a tree for christmas – but could not themselves. I can only guess that this specific christmas tree was the family’s perfect tree. The cost didn’t matter to the young woman at all – but the implicit value even more.

Many decisions are never about the monetary (sunk) costs. Hence your customer makes seemingly odd decisions – and that’s OK. 

See also: Acceptance criteria are more than what can be measuredLook for Minimum Viable TestingWithout Timing – Quality, Schedule and Cost is nothingValue of Information for Decisions , 16 points that may rock the boatWhen do testing happen? Are you looking too hard