A context-driven approach is important! … – in both software testing, software development and large scale systems. Testing practices appropriate to one project will fail in another. Practices appropriate to one project would be criminally negligent in another (rewrite of http://context-driven-testing.com/). Consider the differences between building a new space shuttle compared to your own orbital rocket. Consider shooting a big movie production like “Star Wars 3 – Revenge of the Sith”:

According to the extra material, the climactic fight between Vader and Kenobi took upwards of 70,000 man hours to create – doing the math, this constitutes the work of one man for more than 25 years, given roughly normal hours per day (which probably no one ever did working on this production). imdb

Still even in big movie making the script/manus/plans are changed in the moment:

When Vader is being fitted with the helmet and subsequently breaks free of the shackles, George Lucas decided at the last minute to change the position of Vader’s arms from up to down by his side (the original shot can be seen in the trailers). This is why, after breaking free from the bonds, Vader appears to raise his arms, when in fact it is the necessary transition from computer-generated arms to live action arms. imdb

Also if everything can be planned – why would there be a need for retakes of the scenes? In experimental movies like  Dogma 95 and Pure Cinema movies, with no artificial effects and little manuscripts. It’s the other way around: If everything is based on the here and n0w – then what about the story that the director is telling. Is this not also a vision, a theme, a big picture – a sequence of checks? See also Testing and checking, Bespoke and routinized, the two parts of the brain